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Data Stories

Second in the series -- State and local governments support programs for people facing homelessness.

Many state and local governments have used money from the State and Local Fiscal Recovery Fund (SLFRF) to expand the number of beds in shelters and support services, and create new programs to address the growing problem of homelessness. Read on to see how two states, two counties, and two cities are using these funds to address the challenges people experiencing homelessness face.
08/04/2022

First in the series -- State and local government pilot programs.

State and local governments are using money from the State and Local Fiscal Recovery Fund (SLFRF) to experiment with new pilot programs that tackle issues arising from the pandemic. Here are examples of pilot programs from Connecticut and Iowa, Milwaukee and Orange counties, and San José and Washington, D.C. as described in the recipients’ SLFRF Recovery Plans submitted to the U.S. Department of the Treasury.
07/19/2022

A new data series -- How local governments are spending federal money.

We’ve added even more data to our website and it comes with stories about how the money is being spent. Our new data series will highlight the stories of how more than 3,000 recipients -- state, city, Tribal, and county governments – are spending money received from the $350 billion State and Local Fiscal Recovery Fund (SLFRF).
07/07/2022

How local governments are spending state and local fiscal recovery funds.

The Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds (SLFRF) provides funding to state, local and Tribal governments to address the impacts of COVID-19. We explore some common themes.
06/23/2022

Making sense of prime and sub-recipient data.

Prime recipients receive money directly from the federal government. They may then pay some of the money they received to other entities for goods or services. These entities are sub-recipients.
06/07/2022

$2.3 billion to address mental health issues intensified by the pandemic.

Stress and isolation occurring during the pandemic intensified concerns about the public’s mental health. A report from the Government Accountability Office in December 2021 noted higher rates of anxiety and depression in adults. The report also noted that children, adolescents, health care workers, and certain racial or ethnic populations may be at a higher risk of behavioral health issues.
05/26/2022

How to find award data by pandemic legislation.

As pandemic legislation was passed, starting with the CARES Act in March 2020, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) assigned a code to identify each of the six laws. These codes, known as Disaster Emergency Fund Codes (DEFC), are used to track the spending funded under each legislation. Many of the codes were further refined through the description of the code, as "Emergency" or "Non-emergency."
05/12/2022

The opioid epidemic got worse during the pandemic. A $3.15 billion program addresses the addiction crisis.

More than 100,000 Americans died from drug overdoses from April 2020 to April 2021 according to estimates from the Center for Disease Control. Most of the deaths, nearly 75%, were the result of opioids. To address this crisis, the Department of Health and Human Services is providing a total of $3.15 billion to states for prevention and treatment services.
05/05/2022

After a slow start, states are now spending rental assistance at a steady rate.

Households struggling to pay rent or utility bills received relief from the $25 billion Emergency Rental Assistance (ERA1) program. State and local governments were responsible for administering the funds, which they began receiving in January 2021. The American Rescue Plan Act added $21 billion more to the program (ERA2) in March 2021.
04/21/2022

$76.3 billion to help keep colleges and universities open.

Many colleges and universities closed during the pandemic and faced uncertain futures. To help them remain open, the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF) program provided grants to approximately 4,900 institutions totaling $76.3 billion.
04/14/2022
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