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U.S. Agency for International Development OIG

Audit of USAID's Missions Capacity to Monitor During COVID-19

USAID missions are faced with the unprecedented burdens of continuing operations and routine monitoring of activities in the field—despite the constraints posed by the pandemic. The audit objectives are to (1) determine the extent to which USAID missions’ capacity to monitor programs has been impacted by COVID-19 and (2) assess to what extent USAID has taken steps to mitigate the effects of the pandemic on program monitoring.

U.S. Agency for International Development OIG

COVID-19 Information Brief: USAID COVID-19 Activity Update

This brief provides information on USAID’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and associated challenges, as well as related oversight plans and activities. OIG prepared this informational brief to increase stakeholder knowledge and public transparency regarding these efforts. This brief reports on activities from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic through August 31, 2020.

U.S. Agency for International Development OIG

Audit of Data Quality in Selected in USAID PEPFAR Programs in Africa

This audit will look at the quality of data reported in selected President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) programs to determine if weaknesses exist that may lead to inaccurate results reporting. The objectives of this audit are to assess the extent to which USAID has: (1) designed and implemented internal controls over collecting, verifying, and reporting PEPFAR data; and (2) identified and mitigated the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on its internal controls over PEPFAR data quality.  

U.S. Agency for International Development OIG

Audit of the Role of Ventilators in USAID’s COVID-19 Response

USAID’s activities to assess need and identify appropriate interventions are key in shaping how it responds to public health emergencies.  The primary role of ventilators has been one of the most controversial aspects of USAID’s COVID-19 response, attracting both media and Congressional scrutiny.  The objectives of this audit are to answer the following questions: (1) What are USAID’s practices for assessing needs and prioritizing interventions during public health emergencies? (2) To what extent, if any, did the practices employed to determine the use and allocation of ventilators during the COVID-19 pandemic differ from these practices?

U.S. Agency for International Development OIG

Oversight of Overseas Contingency Operations

As required by section 8L of the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, the Inspectors General for the Department of Defense, Department of State, and USAID work together to report quarterly to Congress on every overseas contingency operation’s progress and corresponding oversight activities.  Starting in the second quarter of fiscal year 2020, these quarterly reports include reporting on the COVID-19 outbreaks in Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq, and the Philippines, as well as the U.S. government response to them.

U.S. Agency for International Development OIG

Key Questions to Inform USAID's COVID-19 Response

This advisory notice poses key questions from past lessons learned for USAID to consider while planning and executing its response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The lessons learned and corresponding questions fall under four broad areas, which mirror the top management challenges we report annually to USAID: (1) managing risks to humanitarian assistance amid a public health emergency of international concern; (2) maintaining responsibilities for planning, monitoring, and sustaining U.S.-funded development; (3) maximizing stakeholder coordination for a global COVID-19 response; and (4) addressing...

U.S. Agency for International Development OIG

Audit of USAID’s Branding and Marking Requirements

USAID’s branding and marking efforts enhance the visibility and value of U.S. foreign assistance and are intended to inform beneficiaries that aid comes from the American people. Unfortunately, according to the Agency, beneficiaries of the billions of dollars of foreign assistance provided by the United States every year often have little to no awareness that the aid they receive is provided by the American people.  The objectives of this audit are to determine the extent to which USAID: (1) has policies and procedures to ensure compliance with statutory branding and marking requirements and (2) provided information and oversight to ensure implementers complied with branding and marking requirements. Given particular interest from Congress amid the ongoing pandemic, this audit will consider the impact of COVID-19 under both objectives as appropriate.

U.S. Agency for International Development OIG

Audit of Local Partner Participation Initiatives in USAID’s PEPFAR Programs in Africa

The Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and Health Diplomacy (OGAC) has established a goal of 70 percent local partner participation in President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) programs by 2020. Included in the definition of local partner participation is government-to-government assistance, which is especially risky in Africa given the levels of political corruption in countries with the greatest HIV prevalence. The objectives of this audit are to: (1) describe the extent to which USAID’s PEPFAR budgets are on track to meet the goal for local partner funding; (2) assess to what extent USAID’s agency-wide strategy has prepared the agency to increase PEPFAR funding to local partners while addressing risks; and (3) assess to what extent selected USAID missions in Africa followed agency guidance designed to achieve the goal for PEPFAR local partner funding while addressing risks.  The audit also explores topics related to the possible effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on USAID’s ability to reach the OGAC target and the extent to which USAID has identified financial and programmatic risks emanating from the pandemic.